Tag Archives: corruption

Would the “cop in my pocket” accept a bribe from News International?

Morgan Freeman in The Dark KnightThis week’s New Scientist features an article entitled Smartphone surveillance: The cop in your pocket (kerching). In it, a rather breathless Nic Fleming waxes lyrically about how, thanks to our smartphones, “we are all set to gain unprecedented crime-fighting abilities.”

Sadly, however, it is not through being able to download mad martial arts skillz via our phones Matrix-style but by using the sensors on our phones to create a near-universal level of surveillance. The residents of Boston, for example, will soon be using their phones to record potholes in the road (thus rendering the Liberal Democrats entirely obsolete). Soon we’ll be able to use our phones to spot GPS jamming and the cameras in the front of our cars to track down stolen cars. If only manufacturers would include gas detectors in our phones, soon we’ll be able to get early warning of sarin gas attacks without having to do a thing.

The civil liberty implications of all this are waved away. We are reassured that software will be developed to guarantee privacy of the individual, with a particular system called “AnonySense” being cited, although it is not at all clear how all the examples illustrated in the article could be used anonymously, nor are the rights of the spied upon (as opposed to the spy) even considered.

But it is not Big Brother that ought to concern us here. What I don’t understand is how this article can be published, weeks after the hacking scandal erupted, without even considering the scope for massive abuse.

Imagine making such universal surveillance just a bung away from use by the tabloid newspapers. How could you even go into hiding from them if every single camera mounted on every single car in the country was just a mouse-click away from a corrupt police officer? This isn’t even theoretical now; we now know that police officers are perfectly willing to offer these services to journalists, safe in the knowledge that both their superiors and the journalists’ will be quite happy to look the other way and claim they didn’t know it was going on. We can delude ourselves that it won’t happen again, but you can bet that it will just as soon as the dust settles sufficiently enough for people to start thinking they can get away with it.

So while it is terribly exciting to think of our phones working like the ones at the end of the film The Dark Knight, the real question is what we can do to stop it from happening, not how it might save us from future attacks by Aum Shinrikyo.

Will the Conservatives join the progressive alliance against corruption?

Simple question: Nick Clegg has repeated Lib Dem calls for an inquiry into the scrapping of an anti-corruption investigation into the Saudi arms deal following revelations that Blair wrote a “who will rid me of this turbulent priest?“-style letter to the Attorney General on the eve of the investigation being dropped. Will David Cameron join this progressive alliance, or not?

Since we are apparently all progressives now, this is surely a no brainer? A basic fundamental tenet of progressivism is the idea of equality under the law, with no exceptions for special status. Who could argue against such a thing?

It is a simple question that demands a simple answer. Perhaps my Tory readers would care to try answering it.

Blue Peter Corrupt – Official

The BBC have truly lost it. Druggie presenters is one thing. Cynical competitive parents buying Blue Peter badges on eBay is quite another. But for Blue Peter to be involved in fixing a competition is, well, tantamount to defecating over the UK’s collective childhood experience.

An apology is not nearly enough. The entire production team and current presenters should be sacked. “Just following orders” cannot be accepted as a legitimate excuse. They should have taken a stand. After this, anything is possible. Konnie Huq modelling the latest in tweenie fetish wear? Some other presenter (I’ve only heard of Konnie Huq) showing kids how to make their own crackpipe out of bits of sticky backed plastic and a washing up liquid bottle? You name it.

The rot has got to be stopped!!!

Seriously, what sort of message does it send out to children if this sort of thing can be just glossed over? The message the BBC is sending out here is corruption is fine, so long as you apologise. Lord Reith must be spinning in his grave.

They have to pay a blood price.